An Annual Journal for Culture and Technology by the Foundation of the Hellenic World
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Issue 1 / 2001
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Contents

Mitsos Bilalis
Studying on the Screen: Interactive Technologies and Historians' Educational Practices, 1994-1999
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Read the whole article (available only in Greek)

Maria Roussou
High-end interactive media in the museum
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Vangelis Christodoulou
3D monument reconstruction and its reception by a varied audience
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Lila Patsiadou
The Coroplast's Art in Boeotia in the Classical Period (475-330 B.C.)
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Aphrodite Kamara
Speaking in Greek? The Use of the Greek Language in the "Dead Cities" of Northern Syria in Late Antiquity
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Vasilis Siametis
The Katholikon of the onastery of Ayia Paraskevi at Monodendri: he Second Phase of the Painting Decoration (1689)
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Eleni Gara
Murderers and Judges in Ottoman Veria (Kara Ferye)
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Seyyed Mohammad T. Shariat-Panahi
Taxation in the kaza of Selanik (Salonica), 1768-1770
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Antonios Anastasopoulos
The Ottoman Court Registers (Seriye sicilleri) of Veria: Classification Problems
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Yorgos Tzedopoulos
The Incorporation of the Rebellion of the Popolari into Greek National History
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Aimilia Salvanou
The Structure of Relation in the "Karlakohori" Village of Corfu: Bilinearity and Preservation of Patrilinear Elements
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Abstracts

Mitsos Bilalis, Studying on the Screen: Interactive Technologies and Historians' Educational Practices, 1994-1999

This paper focuses on the issue of the introduction of innovative technological structures in the historical research and education centers. A bilateral approach is selected: at the first part there is an attempt to trace in brief the major developments that have taken place during the last seven years of the 20th century, highlighting the connection of specific educational functions with cyber-space. In the second part I seek to investigate the perceptions of the above-mentioned course by the very historians' communities. The argument is that, at least in the present stage, the prospects of the so-called "intervention" are not strictly defined by the typified use of the interactive technologies; rather than this, the key-role belongs to the potential of the subjects of the historical research along with the members of the educational communities to perceive the "new"
Read the whole article (available only in Greek)

Maria Roussou, High-end interactive media in the museum

This paper examines the issues involved in the use of high-end interactive media, computer graphics applications and virtual reality technology in museums. As museums adapt advanced digital media for use in exhibitions and public programmes, new relationships take place between the audience, the venue, the virtual representation and the real object or fact. While the use of state-of-the-art technology can effectively shape how museums deliver public education, issues of high cost and maintenance of such technology, larger and diverse audience throughput and difficulty in content development present important drawbacks. Both the benefits as well as the problems caused by the deployment of technology in the museum will be analysed. Examples will be presented of special museums worldwide that use technology in innovative ways for educational and artistic purposes. Particular focus is given to the presentation of the projects created by the Foundation of the Hellenic World (FHW), a cultural heritage institution in Greece, that uses immersive virtual reality, VRML, and three-dimensional graphics for the reconstruction of archeological sites, historical interpretation, and education.

Vangelis Christodoulou, 3D monument reconstruction and its reception by a varied audience

The 3D Graphics Sector of the Foundation of the Hellenic World produces digital, three-dimensional representations of archaeological monuments and sites. Three types of 3D models are produced: fully photorealistic, VRML, and Virtual Reality models. This article deals with the methodology used in 3D models production, the way the public responds to 3D reconstruction, and with considerations arising from the interaction between such technological innovations and history and archaeology.

Lila Patsiadou, The Coroplast's Art in Boeotia in the Classical Period (475-330 B.C.)

The aim of this article is to present the general guidelines of the development of the Boeotian coroplast's art in the Classical period. Given the fact that Boeotia was one of the most important coroplast centers in the Ancient Greek world, mention is made of the Boeotian workshops' production beyond the boundaries of the classical period.
The figurines are being examined on the basis of the stylistic development of their basic types during the 5th and 4th centuries B.C. Other aspects stressed in the article are techniques of manufacture and decoration, as well as relations with other major workshops and with sculpture.

Aphrodite Kamara, Speaking in Greek? The Use of the Greek Language in the "Dead Cities" of Northern Syria in Late Antiquity

The countryside of Northern Syria was dominated by a complex of settlements administratively linked to major cities, such as Antioch or Apamea. Although part of the settlers had been Roman veterans of the Roman army, Latin was used only scantily. After the Tetrarchy Latin seems to have been completely obliterated. The use of Greek was intensified with the spread of Christianity, as all Christian inscriptions up to the end of the 5th century were written in Greek. It is only at that time that the first inscriptions in Syriac, the local Aramean dialect, appear. The extensive use of Greek can only be explained through the leading role of the Church of Antioch in the formation of the rural clergy, whereas the increasing use of Syriac can be attributed to the spread of monophysism and the increasing power of the Syrian monks and ascetics, hostile to the Antiochene doctrines.

Vasilis Siametis, The atholikon of the onastery of Ayia Paraskevi at Monodendri: he Second Phase of the Painting Decoration (1689)

The study concerns the monastery of Ayia Paraskevi at Monodendri, and especially the second phase of the painting decoration of the katholikon (monastery church). This phase is chronologically placed, according to a donor's inscription, in 1689 and comprises the representations on the south wall of the one-aisle church, which are developed in three superimposed registers: seven scenes of the Dodekaorton, a group of twelve full-length saints and a band of geometrical ornament. The iconographic analysis of the scenes proves that their prototypes are consecrated forms of the Cretan school, particularly the ones which have been used for the icons' decoration and the illustrations of Akathistos. Sometimes the compositions are also enriched with few popular elements. The small depicted surface and the uniform style of the decoration indicate that we have to do with the work of only one painter, whose identity is unknown; consequently we could speak about him only with suppositions.

Eleni Gara, Murderers and Judges in Ottoman Veria (Kara Ferye)

The article discusses the processes of crime detection, court hearing and punishment in seventeenth-century Ottoman Empire. As a way of approaching the issue, the analysis focuses on a particular murder case, that of Mirza suba{, who was murdered in the town of Veria (Kara Ferye) in June 1620. The narration closely follows the steps of the authorities and persons involved in that case, using as a guide the relevant archival sources, three entries from the Ottoman court registers (kad sicilleri) of the town.

Seyyed Mohammad T. Shariat-Panahi, Taxation in the kaza of Selanik (Salonica), 1768-1770

The article focuses on the taxation of the population of the kaza (administrative district) of Selanik (Salonica) during the first two years of the first Russian-Ottoman war (1768-1774). The central point of the article is the increase of the tax quote of the kaza, which was due to the war and had as a result the reaction of the population. A brief presentation of the historical and geographical framework as well as of the tax regime of the inhabitants is followed by an analysis of the taxation between 1768-1770. In this respect light is shed both on the contribution of the kaza of Selanik to the tax income of the Ottoman state and on the reaction of the local society in circumstances of unusual financial pressure on the part of the authorities.

Antonios Anastasopoulos, The Ottoman Court Registers (Seriye sicilleri) of Veria: Classification Problems

The introductory section of the paper is dedicated to the history of the Ottoman court registers of Veria since their discovery in the old Ottoman courthouse of the town in 1918. The author discusses two issues in the light of this account: the numbering that some of the registers bear on their covers (these numbers do not coincide with the respective numbers of the catalogue of the archive of Veria) and the page numbering of the registers. As is illustrated by the appendix and discussed in the article, both the cover and the page numberings are not as irrational as they originally appear to be, but can be accounted for on the basis of the handling of the registers in the course of the twentieth century.

Yorgos Tzedopoulos, The Incorporation of the Rebellion of the Popolari into Greek National History

The rebellion of Zante's urban population in 1628, at a time when the Ionian Islands were under Venetian rule, is known as rebellion of the popolari. Until recently, the only historical source referring to it was the chronicle of Angelos Soumakis, a Zantiote who was contemporary to the events. The limited amount of historical sources contributed to a rather ideologically than scientifically based analysis of the rebellion by Greek historiography. The aim of this article is to explore how the Greek historians of the nineteenth century incorporated the 1628 rebellion into the body of national history and how they used it in order to justify their argumentation in the ideological and political controversies of the time.

Aimilia Salvanou, The Structure of Relation in the "Karlakohori" Village of Corfu: Bilinearity and Preservation of Patrilinear Elements

The present article regards the structure of relation in a village community of Corfu, in particular the genealogical memory, parental property transfer, marital strategies, as well as the post-marital settlement practices. Fundamental point of the article is that, although the community recognizes the bilinear descent, it shows in fact strong patrilinear tendencies that affect the lifestyle of its members, since it fosters the application of a common law rather than that of the Civil Code. Furthermore such tendencies also seem to affect the essential definition of relation and genealogical memory. The research has been based on the practice of open-type and questionnaire interviews, as well as on archive material from the Court of the First Instance and from the community Land Registry.




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2001: Foundation of the Hellenic World